Virginia Roundup

Here is a quick roundup of links from around the state that you may have missed in the last couple of weeks.

VITA Project Raises Doubt on Privatization | Charlottesville Daily Progress
Virginia has been on a privatization boom in the last 20 years. Government has turned to private enterprises to administer state projects on everything from roads to technology projects. However, problem with Virginia's $2.3 billion IT Services contract with Northrop Grumman have some officials reconsidering the merits of privatization.

Court: Virginia Schools Can Ban Sex Offenders | The Associated Press
The Virginia Supreme Court ruled that schools have the right to ban sex offenders from coming on to their property and that judges cannot force schools to allow sex offenders on campus.

Drinking Games | The Washington Post
The Washington Post editorial board takes a look at Bob McDonnell's proposal to fund transportation by privatizing state liquor stores, which McDonnell claims will raise $500 million.

Fairfax Isn't Paying Fees, Say Lawyers For Indigent | The Washington Post
Fairfax County has been sued by attorneys who claim that the court clerk has failed to process payments owed to them for defending indigent defendants in the County's Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court. Lawyers who represent poor defendants claim that they have not been payed in months and that the court clerk has repeatedly failed to address the issue.

Metropolicy: Transportation | The Richmond Times-Dispatch
In light of proposals to build a light rail system in Central Virginia, the Richmond Times-Dispatch editorial board takes a look at the implementation of a light rail network that was recently build to link Phoenix with surrounding cities. Although the Phoenix system has surprised even it's critics with strong ridership numbers, it came in over-budget and is massively subsidized.

Reservoir Fight Ends on Peninsula | The Virginia Pilot
Newport News officials gave up on a 22 year effort to build a 13 billion gallon reservoir in King William County. Problems obtaining permits and environmental challenges doomed the project. However, argues the Virginia Pilot editorial board, the decision to give up is a good one because there are other ways to meet the water needs of the Peninsula.

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